Race 2 morning update, 25 May

25 May 2010

Race 2 morning update, 25 May
After a good start from Varna yesterday, the tall ships competing in Race 2 of the Historical Seas Tall Ships Regatta, have made good progress over night, with the leading vessel Hansa, Spain clocking 10kts of boatspeed at times. She is now just 44 miles from the finish line off Istanbul.

Adonis, Greece is lying second on the water with 50 miles to go, while the white schooner Bodrum, Turkey is in third – 56 miles to the finish.

The race claimed one casualty overnight with the gaff schooner Marea, Rep. Moldova dropping her foremast. She has returned to Varna while the crew make preparations for repair.

Meanwhile, the wind from the south-west, remains a steady 8kts, which means most vessels should cross the finish line sometime today. From there the fleet will sail back through the Bosphorus to the heart of Istanbul, where they’ll remain until the start of the Race 3.

On corrected time, the overall leader is currently Tecla (pictured above), Netherlands (Class B), with Alex Von Humboldt, Germany (Class A) in second, Adonis, Greece (Class D), third, and Mythos, Greece (Class C) fourth.


To track the Historical Seas Tall Ships Regatta fleet as they race click here

To view the current placings of the race click here

To view the combined race results of Leg 1 and 2 of Race 1 click here.

The Historical Seas Tall Ships Regatta is organised by Sail Training International.
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CorinneH Report as offensive

Wednesday, 26 May 2010 2:21 PM


Sail Training International apologise for not posting an 1800 report yesterday but this was due to the staff travelling between ports and being unable to access the website. We always make all efforts to ensure reports are posted on time so apologise for this oversight.

Tio Anton Report as offensive

Tuesday, 25 May 2010 10:10 PM


2100 GMT and still waiting for your 1800 GMT report. What is wrong?

Regards,

Tío Antón